Eugene Vincent Brown obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Eugene Vincent Brown

May 29, 1926 - June 9, 2017

Obituary


Eugene Vincent Brown passed from this life into God's loving embrace June 9, 2017. A memorial service will be held June 15, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. in the chapel at Moore Funeral Home - Arlington, with graveside service immediately following. Visitation is at 1:00 p.m.
Eugene was born May 29, 1926 in Quapaw, Oklahoma.
After serving in the United States Navy during WWII, in 1948, he married the love of his life, Estelle F. Skipworth (deceased). Eugene worked for Armour's many years before retiring from the United States Postal Service.
He was a proud member...

Eugene Vincent Brown passed from this life into God's loving embrace June 9, 2017. A memorial service will be held June 15, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. in the chapel at Moore Funeral Home - Arlington, with graveside service immediately following. Visitation is at 1:00 p.m.
Eugene was born May 29, 1926 in Quapaw, Oklahoma.
After serving in the United States Navy during WWII, in 1948, he married the love of his life, Estelle F. Skipworth (deceased). Eugene worked for Armour's many years before retiring from the United States Postal Service.
He was a proud member of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, also the NCGLNAC, and served as elder for the UTA Native American Association. He also served as a member of the Miami Tribe of Indiana. A talented artist and skilled craftsman who after retirement followed his passion in expressing his Native American Miami heritage through the countless beautiful works of art. He created, in wood, a sculpture that was translated into bronze to commemorate the 200th year anniversary of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. He titled it, "A Tribe Named Miami, A Surveyor's Stake, A Town Named Oxford". The wooden sculpture includes a turtle with a sand hill crane and loon on its back with cattails and other wetlands plants. The bronze sculpture resides at the Miami University Art Museum.
Eugene was proud to be Miami as elder, teacher, and storyteller of his tribe. "I want to preserve American Indian culture," he said, "If just one generation keeps it and doesn't pass it on, then it is lost". He was well known for making flutes that he gave to family, friends, museums in three states, tribal chiefs, and to people he had just met. "Flutes carry cultural stories for future generations," he said, "They help link the generations."
He is survived by daughter, Janie L. Rothrock, son-in-law, Gary P. Rothrock, sister Letha Beam, and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.
He was dearly loved by family and friends with a sweet spirit of generosity, mirth, and big heart.
All of us will miss you very much Eugene. A part of our heart's journey with you until we meet again. You were an inspiration & blessing to us all.